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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 208 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but it seemed to me whenever nixon said, kennedy just looked at him and smirked. which played into kennedy's hands. he did have the indian side on that nixon. nixon gave him a poor family. he was clumsy. and he was defending an administration that he is not only in support of. >> what is the first thing you want to see as the debate began? >> that is an interesting question. i think maybe what i want to see is nothing. and maybe for the first time i will turn the tv on, walk into the other room and listen. and see what can be cleaned by focusing on what is being said, -- what can be gleaned by focusing on what is being said. >> we can stand by them. but that goes to the radio point of people who are listening to nixon on radio. >> i am listening for things that are said by the candidates, and especially things that i can then go back and verify after. to listen for claims, for arguments that i can go back and say, is this something that is real, that is credible? and then look out for other information that either verifies or --. >> i want to make a comment on the appearance of thing. that
. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy >> reporter: they began just 52 years ago on september 26, 1960. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i hope he would grant me the same >> schieffer: some people who listened to it on the radio thought that nixon won but it was generally conceded that people who watched it on television were pretty convinced that jack kennedy won >> absolutely. what you say is important. but what you look like can be also as important >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement >> i have no comment and in nixon's case, he percent spired. he had the audacity to per spire. as a consequence, the venue where you are where a debate goes on, it's like a meat locker. that's the reason. they negotiate how cold it's going to be because nobody wants to per spire because look what happened to nixon. it's amazing. >> schieffer: even a great communicator like franklin roosevelt knew the risk of debating. he was a heavy favorite to win re-election in 1940, so when republican wende
. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> roun brown's in the national journal wrote the main reason oen is doing better in battleground zats has to do with his increase from white working women. keep in mind, back in 2008 nationally obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, hovers around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. lo
-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in fact, over the last five years, no other energy company has invested more in the us than bp. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. today, our commitment to the gulf, and to america, has never been st
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> ron brown's in "the national journal" wrote, the main reason obama is doing better in battleground states has to do with his increase from white working women. working class women. keep in mind, back in 2008, nationally, obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, the number hovers in those cases around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. looking good for the president with white working class women. what an interesting category to be moving ahead in. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." today we saw a blow to the nationwide republican effort to suppress democratic turnout. a pennsylvania judge blocked a strict voter photo i.d. requirement from going into effect before election day. judge robert simpson wrote in part, i am not still -- i am not still convinced that there will be no voter disenfranchisement ar
. really from 1858 until 1960, john f. kennedy versus richard nixon, debates didn't play that big a role in presidential campaigns. there were no presidential debates. but you did have in primaries occasionally, squareoffs going on. interesting to even think about stats from minnesota rarely run for president -- stacken ran for president every four years. kennedy/nixon was the game changer in debate history. people that listened to it thought nixon won on radio but on television, john f. kennedy won. nobody was that happy with the debates. we had no debates in '64 '68 '72. came back in 1976 when jimmy carter ended up doing well because of gerald ford's famous gaffe. that's the big question. can you become gaffe-free? everybody is going to be looking wednesday night to see if there was a mistake made by either person. it puts a lot of pressure on the candidates. >> jennifer: you mention nixon and kennedy and those who saw the debate felt like kennedy won. what do you think is more important? what the candida
no more lies. no more apologies, no more coverups. richard nixon resigned because of lies and coverups. bill clinton was impeached for lies. where is the accountability in this administration? own up to the fact we are at war with an evil force that will never be satisfied until we are all dead. this is not about political offices or expanded geopolitical borders. this is about the survival of our civilization. if this administration won't lead in the battle, then step aside and let someone do it who won't lie to us and endanger our children. [ applause ] on friday the director of national intelligence issued a statement. joining me is katherine hair aj. why this document on friday afternoon? >> you know when you've got bad news the place you put it, that is when we had with the statement. this is a person who is top intelligence officer in the united states government. i have the statement right here. what i believe it does it attempts to give the administration some cover for their initial comments and then concludes what we saw in libya wasn't terrorism. there is a problem here. whe
gives you an idea of how much the country has changed in a good way. but, right after richard nixon became president, four vacancies appear on the supreme court. you never know how that will work. jimmy carter was the only proven to serve a full term without having a single nominee. but richard nixon was on the president for five and a half years. you will recall he had to leave early remember. [laughter] but he got for appointments in the supreme court because chief justice warren left, john hollen and hugo black left and they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, lewis powell and william rehnquist and as you think about that list, it illustrates the scene that i think is a very in part and part of the oath but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it's the most important story in the supreme court because moderate republicans dominated the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. they
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy >> reporter: they began just 52 years ago on september 26, 1960. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i hope he would grant me the same >> schieffer: some people who listened to it on the radio thought that nixon won but it was generally conceded that people who watched it on television were pretty convinced that jack kennedy won >> absolutely. what you say is important. but what you look like can be also as important >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement >> i have no comment and in nixon's case, he percent spired. he had the audacity to per spire. as a consequence, the venue where you are where a debate goes on, it's like a meat locker. that's the reason. they negotiate how cold it's going to be because nobody wants to per spire because look what happened to nixon. it's amazing. >> schieffer: even a great communicator like franklin roosevelt knew the risk of debating. he was a heavy favorite to win re-election in 1940, so when republican wendell wilke demanded a debate, f.d.
. i'd say no more lies, no more apologies, no more coverups. retched nixon lied because of coverups and bill clinton i am protested because of lies and coverups, where is the accountability in this administration, own up to the fact that we are at war with an evil force never be molified or satisfied until we're all dead. this is not about political offices or expanded geopolitical orders, this is about the survival of our civilization, if this administration can't or won't lead in the battle then step aside and let someone do it who won't lie to us and endanger our children. [applause] well, on friday, the office of the director of national intelligence issued a statement, attempting to put the matter to rest, going to washington is the chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge. why this document dump on a friday afternoon? >> well, you know, governor, as well as everyone else when you've got bad news, the place you put it is late on friday, what we had with the statement from director of national intelligence, a person who is a top intelligence officer in the united stat
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
the first-ever televised debate richard nixon chose to wear no makeup. with a 5:00 shadow he looked sweaty and uncomfortable compared to the tanned, relaxed john f. kennedy. then voters heard the impatient sighs of al gore. it was clear by the microphones while george w. bush was talking. it played into a larger narrative into the campaigns. it re-inforced what the audience thought about the candidates. >> when gore sighed endlessly and moaned during the debate and we saw that on television, it just emphasized the idea that he was arrogant and condescending, something people were already concerned about. when nixon was sweating, there was some sense that he was already shifty and there was an anxiety in his soul as well as his body. >> that's what the question in this campaign is about. >> reporter: in a later debate that year gore appeared to invade the personal space of bush. >> i believe i can. >> reporter: a move which made him look awkward compared to his relaxed opponent. in 1992 george h.w. bush was caught twice by cameras glancing at his watch during a town hall debate with voters
. unfortunately, lyndon johnson's doctors denied his request to meet the queen. richard nixon had been very eager to please the queen since their first meeting in 1957 when he gave her a book entitled the art of readable writing. in an effort to improve their public speaking. which had been criticized in the british press. nixon also hosted a stand-in or for prince philip in the white house, which prompted barbara walters to scold him for not including any women. nixon had princess anne and two children visit in washington, even trying to fix up his trials with his daughter, patricia, once of the prime minister's residence in the country, but he never managed to get the queen over here for a state visit. his successor was the ambitious post in 1976. he game this week against with the queen at the white house to the unfortunate choice of the lady is a champ. planning went somewhat awry, as it did at the british ambassador's reception for 1600 people during the washington leg of their tour. elizabeth was being trailed by tv cameramen with very big bright lights. when suddenly, this cameraman disapp
of how much the country has changed in a good way. but right after richard nixon became president, for vacancies appeared on the sprinkler. you never know how that's going to work. jimmy carter is the only president in american history to serve a full term without having a single nominee. there were no vacations while he was there. richard nixon was only president for five and half years. he had to leave early, remember? [laughter] geek out for appointments because chief justice warren left. john hartman and hugo black left. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, powell, and william rehnquist. and as you think about that list, it illustrates a theme that a think, it's a very important part of "the oath" but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because modern republicans dominate the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. the
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
democrat jay nixon is seeking his second term running against dave spencer also libertarian jim higgs and it's raised as lean democratic. september 21st this comes to us from kmiz-tv. it's about an hour. >> governor nixon. go ahead. >> it's a pleasure to see so many friends we have worked with for so many years one of the reasons i ran for the governor and the things i've done for the last four and a half years now, a lot of that goes back to the small town in missouri. i had an opportunity to see my mother and father actively involved in public service on the school board. my dad as the mayor and in the evenings when the phone would ring someone would call it a problem. i would often be the one that would head back to the kitchen table and plead the case of that person. what i saw with my mom and dad was a focus on making sure they help solve those problems in a positive way. they didn't ask whether the question can democrat or republican or from someone who supported him or not. they said what can we do to move our city, our area for word, and that is what i have done as your govern
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
this is exactly what richard nixon said in his debate with jack kennedy. i share jack kennedy's mission. i share his concerns. we have the same goals. people at home are cringing, why am i giving him money, why am i voting for a guy who has the same goals as another guy. cynthia, you will probably not remember the nixon/kennedy debates, but you don't say the other guy is a good, compassionate guy and he cares about people. i do, too! that's what he's saying. i'm just like him. if you believe he's compassionate, i am too! he's selling obama. >> you say that if you don't have anything else to say, chris. another thing the bloomberg poll shows is that voters -- more voters believe that barack obama has a concrete plan for helping the middle class than believe that mitt romney has such a plan. that's another problem mitt romney has. he had expected that the economy would win the election for him. all he would have to do is go to people and say, i'm not barack obama. i can do a better job. in fact, he needed to do a lot more. obama has laid out specific proposals. he's had a job for months now, but m
was that? "a" dwight eisenhower, richard nixon, herbert hoover. who was on the blueprint. that is right. eisenhower. that was an easy one. i read that extensively and killing kennedy comes out on tuesday. thank you very much with putting up with me. 1998 bill clinton found also in one of the biggest presidential scandals the country had ever seen. >> i want you to listen to me. i'm going say this again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman. i never told anybody to lie, not a single time, never. >> bill: because of the scandal, bill clinton became a second u.s. president to be impeached. who was the first? nixon, polk, martin van burren. >> that is correct. andrew johnson. he escaped by how many votes? >> one. >> a very good. >> bill: one vote he would have been toast. alien extradition acts is most controversial u.s. laws of their time. >> in 1798 french warships seized american vessels trading with england. frightened by the possibility of invasion they passed the alien and sedition act the power to deport any alien and made citizens who criticized the government liable to a
5010 jobs in 48 uneconomic development. jane nixon is not within the same world. we are in the world with hurt and despair. you see people putting $5 of gas in their tank because that's all they have. people wake up tomorrow hoping it's no worse than today and is going to the good life. it's okay for him. he's been on the payroll for 26 years. he is penchant for the rest of the site that we're going to pay. i'm sorry, the real world is about results and the results is where we find ourselves. in the real world, the ceo would be fired. >> was moved her next question then. this comes from miller and goes first first two days spent. >> colombia and other communities struggling to close the achievement gap among school children of different races. statewide data shows clear racial disparities in many socioeconomic indicators such as employment, education, homeownership and business ownership. what do you make of that? and as governor, what would you do to address it? >> i think it's all about jobs. we need more people getting taxpayers a number of people living off the government. you kn
do. >>> the candidates need no introduction. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i would hope he would grant me the same. the question before us is, which point of view and which party do we want to lead the united states? >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement? >> i have no comment. >> the sweat pooling onyxen's chin while kennedy is over there cold chillin'. was the presidential race decided right there because of heavy perspiration on the vice presidential mug? can you see who won the first televised presidential debate with the sound off or is that an oversimplification of a slew of factor sfls do campaigns matter or does the man with the best platform for that moment in history actually win? our next guest studied the last six decades of campaignsin exploring thorg. how campaigns do and do not matter. christopher, how are you? >> great. >> i'm of the school that campaigns do matter. that you have to present your ideas and present
evaporate by election day. in 1968, hub bert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. while nixon won it was by less than 1%. in 1976, jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates, ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll though narrowly lost. in 1980, carter maintained a consistent advantage over ronald reagan, but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states, a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others, the republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes, particularly from news organizations, less than do democrats. >> in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the democratic convention, but lost to bush by 7.5%. in 1992, the incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september, tied with bill clinton by the end of octob
. >>> a dramatic rescue in portland, maine, caught on cell phone camera. 84-year-old ursula nixon lost control of her car on friday, and some good samaritans braved the cold waters to pull her out. police say nixon sped through a stop sign, two fences and an oceanfront barrier before she ended up in the portland harbor. she's in fair condition. several of her rescuers were treated for hypothermia. >>> a 10-year-old boy in philadelphia is in big trouble. see that white van crashing into those cars right there. police say on sunday he stole it and he's the one behind the wheel. surveillance camera shows him getting out and trying to run away, but someone stops him. police say the boy saw the keys on the rear door and went on a bief joyride. he wasn't just slapped on the wrist either. he's expected to be charged with auto theft. >>> in hong kong, an investigation into a deadly ferry collision is under way. at least 36 people were killed. dozens injured. a boat filled with revelers slammed into the ferry. more than 100 people were rescued and sent to hospitals. one person is still missing. report
. >> john f. kennedy, a young senator from massachusetts, facing off against vice president richard nixon, who is known to be a fierce debater. but on screen, kennedy looks cool and calm, while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. nixon flounders under the glare of television for all four debates. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in his debate with georgia govern oor jimmy carter. >> there is no soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry, could i just -- >> the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and is blamed by many for costing ford the election. in 1980, ronald reagan is repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> but reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> four years later, president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age duri
power on a certain level. i mean, look, nixon, reagan, george w. bush, republican presidents have learned how to get stuff done at times in the face of congress and sometimes controlled by the other party. you know, this whole notion of the imperial presidency that arose under nixon, not coincidentally, a republican, i think you said it was kind of a tori sense built. but it's really a concentration of power. >> are they stronger than the democrats and they know what that is? assembly, parliamentary? >> in some ways they have been more skillful and more ruthless in the way that they have moved the levers of power. in washington and outside of washington, to get stuff done. >> joy, i don't think the republicans have a karl rove a. malignant sense of power, i'm going to be the architect and i'm going to rule and they are spreading the money around and trying to get back the power. it does seem almost obsessive, the love of the white house. >> i think eugene robinson is right. for conservatives, the idea of being the cowboy, they like the self-image for themselves and want that image
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 208 (some duplicates have been removed)

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